Changes between Version 4 and Version 5 of Processing/atmosphericcorrection


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Timestamp:
Feb 8, 2016 10:01:17 AM (4 years ago)
Author:
mark1
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  • Processing/atmosphericcorrection

    v4 v5  
    1414Please read the above guides as they cover the subject in much more detail than we can here. The following should give a brief summary of general "do's and don'ts", some of which may be obvious but are easy to forget when out in the field.
    1515
     16=== Key points ===
     17
     18* the better the measurements are documented, the better they can be used!
     19* always record time correctly (check the system and instrument clocks are correct), record time zone and daylight savings time etc.
     20
     21
    1622=== Prior to the survey ===
    1723
    1824* Test the instruments - both to check that they are working and to give you practice in using them. Ideally attend training courses such as that offered by the Field Spectroscopy Facility (FSF), this is a requirement if you borrow instruments from FSF.
    1925* Plan the survey - identify suitable targets before the survey day, either by visiting the site in person or using online or offline map data. Save as much time as possible so that when the survey day arrives you can spend your time collecting measurements. Only consider targets within the area of the remote sensing survey.
     26* Consider both 'bright' and 'dark' targets, especially if one wants to perform a vicarious calibration.
     27* Print off spare maps to take with you to record where you actually take the measurements. Note this is not an excuse not to use GPS!
     28* If your instrument is capable, set it up to measure in radiance and convert to reflectance in post-processing.
     29* Read scientific papers and guides on the topic and make sure you are collecting what YOU need for YOUR study. You only have one chance to get it right.
    2030* Remember the spare batteries - don't get out to the field only to find you have no power.
    2131* Remember to take lunch / refreshments with you - it will be a long day!
     
    2434
    2535* Do not stand between the sun and the survey point - you will cast a shadow over the area. Ideally stand as far back as possible so as not to create erroneous reflections.
    26 * Measure level, homogeneous targets of greater size than the resolution of the remote sensing data. In most cases this is not possible (even a square metre of concrete is not perfectly homogeneous) but try and find suitable targets. For example an expanse of car park may be suitable, a field of grass, a body of deep water. Surfaces that are not level will suffer greater from erroneous reflections (see bi-directional reflectance distribution fuinction (BRDF)).
    27 * Make sure you collect more than one observation over the target to improve the measurement statistics (get as many as possible).
     36* Measure level, homogeneous targets of greater size (5 - 10 times) than the resolution of the remote sensing data. In most cases this is not possible (even a square metre of concrete is not perfectly homogeneous) but try and find suitable targets. For example an expanse of car park may be suitable, a field of grass, a body of deep water. Surfaces that are not level will suffer greater from erroneous reflections (see bi-directional reflectance distribution fuinction (BRDF)). Remote sensing data will suffer from adjacency effects so the larger the target the better.
     37* Make sure you collect more than one observation over the target to improve the measurement statistics (get as many as possible to calculate averages and standard deviations).
    2838* Try to measure near the centre of the targets rather than the edge where possible. For example, if you survey a car park do not observe near the boundary fence or hedge. If observing a water body remember the depth of the bottom will also affect the reflectance (e.g. the shallow boundaries will be different to the deep centre).
    2939* Always get an accurate measurement of position (use GNSS / GPS connected to the measurement instrument). You may need to measure the same target for many seconds to get a more accurate position measurement.
    30 * Take photographs - they will act as a reminder to the conditions of the day and the targets surveyed.
     40* Take photographs - they will act as a reminder to the conditions of the day and the targets surveyed. Take as many as you can of close-ups of targets and photos of the wider general set-up. Use something for scale too.
    3141* Measure a mixture of targets - each target will have different spectral responses and you don't want to collect only targets with response in the VNIR (visible near infra-red) range if you are also interested in the SWIR (short wave infra-red).
    3242* Use calibrated targets - if you have these available and they are suitable for positioning over the airborne survey site (and suitable for the airborne instruments) then use them.
     43* Record the sky conditions; are there clouds; at what time were there clouds. Take photos of the sky to aid recording. Make measurements of AOT (aerosol optical thickness) if possible or sky irradiance.
     44* Measure the white reference often (every other measurement).
    3345
    3446== Available software ==